Capitalism

and why we need to get over it 

 

by Tam Cuss

 

 

Many of us question the way our societies work. Some of us are comfortable, but we all know there’s poverty, pollution, war and waste. And they seem inevitable.

 

The system we live under – the system that produces great wealth for some, but under which poverty, pollution, war and waste persist – is capitalism.

 

We’re supposed to believe that, for all its faults, capitalism is the fairest and most efficient economic system. The message is repeated constantly: whatever is good for business is good for all of us; capitalists are the wealth-creators in society; economic inequality is both inevitable and the price worth paying for the benefits of capitalism.

 

These are elements of capitalist ideology – the ideas designed to justify the system – ideas dressed up to look like common sense. They are misleading, and my aim is to show why.

 

Of course, capitalism is not responsible for all our social problems. And some of them were around long before capitalism developed. But we need to overcome them, and capitalism prevents us from doing so.

 

We have to know what’s wrong with something before we can change it for the better. So we need to understand how capitalism works, and why it harms us. Then we can work out how to improve things.

 

However, my purpose here is not to propose an alternative to capitalism, but only to show why we need one.

 

The case against capitalism is both economic and moral: because it creates and relies on economic inequality, capitalism is not the most socially efficient productive system; and this inherent inequality is why it is an immoral system.

 

This argument is not original. Criticism of capitalism is as old as the system itself. My aim is just to simplify and clarify the issues.

 

If what I’ve written only makes you think and argue, then that’s a start. And here’s something to get you going: Capitalism is organised crime. Together, we’ll crack it.

 

 

About the author 

 

T A Cuss was born in Prague in 1968, but the family had to leave. Tam grew up in London and Paris, became politically active and began a lifetime’s campaigning against injustice. In 1996, Tam became a ‘Philo’ of the Académie Républicaine.

 

Capitalism: and why we need to get over it  will be available as a Kindle book from Amazon. But you can see it here now - go to Capitalism in the main menu.